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  • The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    In 1999, Adeline Merçon weighed 79 pounds and was dying of AIDS in rural Haiti, even though effective treatment had become standard in wealthy countries years earlier. Partners In Health co-founders Dr. Paul Farmer and Ophelia Dahl hiked to her house and promised to bring back the antiretroviral drugs to save her life.
  • The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Partners In Health scrounged the cash to buy medicine for Merçon, and she quickly recovered. Her photo, taken at a party for herself and other patients, appeared in The Lancet in 2001. “What can I say? The medicines are eloquent enough,” Merçon said. “What they have done for me is amazing." 
  • The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Merçon was the first of about 60 patients whom Partners In Health and our Haitian sister organization, Zanmi Lasante, started on ART in the early 2000s. At the time, almost no poor rural people had access to the drugs, which were priced between $12,000 and $16,000 a year. So began the HIV Equity Initiative.
  • The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    St. Coeur François, a Haitian farmer, weighed 88 pounds in 2000, when he started antiretroviral therapy. "Everyone with AIDS should be able to get treatment, since we’re all God’s children. Science is for everyone."
  • The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Nerlande Lahens was also dying of AIDS when she started ART. As more patients went on treatment and recovered, local attitudes about HIV began changing, and demand increased for prevention and HIV testing. "This is what they call the Lazarus effect," said Dr. Fernet Léandre, co-executive director of Zanmi Lasante. "For the first time, people see someone coming from their deathbed back to life." 
  • Posted on December 01, 2012
    The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    In 1999, Adeline Merçon weighed 79 pounds and was dying of AIDS in rural Haiti, even though effective treatment had become standard in wealthy countries years earlier. Partners In Health co-founders Dr. Paul Farmer and Ophelia Dahl hiked to her house and promised to bring back the antiretroviral drugs to save her life.
  • Posted on December 01, 2012
    The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Partners In Health scrounged the cash to buy medicine for Merçon, and she quickly recovered. Her photo, taken at a party for herself and other patients, appeared in The Lancet in 2001. “What can I say? The medicines are eloquent enough,” Merçon said. “What they have done for me is amazing." 
  • Posted on December 01, 2012
    The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Merçon was the first of about 60 patients whom Partners In Health and our Haitian sister organization, Zanmi Lasante, started on ART in the early 2000s. At the time, almost no poor rural people had access to the drugs, which were priced between $12,000 and $16,000 a year. So began the HIV Equity Initiative.
  • Posted on December 01, 2012
    The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    St. Coeur François, a Haitian farmer, weighed 88 pounds in 2000, when he started antiretroviral therapy. "Everyone with AIDS should be able to get treatment, since we’re all God’s children. Science is for everyone."
  • Posted on December 01, 2012
    The HIV Equity Initiative: Fighting the Status Quo to Bring Treatment to the Poor
    Nerlande Lahens was also dying of AIDS when she started ART. As more patients went on treatment and recovered, local attitudes about HIV began changing, and demand increased for prevention and HIV testing. "This is what they call the Lazarus effect," said Dr. Fernet Léandre, co-executive director of Zanmi Lasante. "For the first time, people see someone coming from their deathbed back to life."